Keep Calm and Caregive On

We all know that providing care for a loved one can be difficult. Even if we might be happy to help a friend or family member in need, caregiving can still take its toll. It can be physically demanding causing body tension and pain. It can also be emotionally draining led by the stress of seeing the person you care for deteriorate. With an overflowing plate of newfound responsibilities, caregivers are kept running with – seemingly – little time to rest. Despite this, caregivers continue providing care.

Keep calm and caregive on … sounds counterintuitive, right? Caregivers can often overlook two important points – both of which can make the job of helping and supporting an ill or aging senior much easier and more enjoyable.

Join author, Rick Lauber, for his Huddol webinar, as he discusses the crucial concepts of taking respite (or including some type of personal escape from caregiving) and finding joy in caregiving. Respite provides people with a short period of relief of their daily struggles or stressors. Taking time for yourself will allow you to improve your mental and physical wellness to make you ready to get back in the caregiving game. Finding the joys in caregiving may take some time; however, these are not completely invisible.

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Reviews

Caregiver's Guide for Canadians

A superbly written and well documented book that guides the reader through typical eldercare issues provided by professional and private caregivers. Rick Lauber is a Canadian author who offers a comprehensive guide to care of our loved ones in their "greying" years, including resources, checklists, and worksheets. The author packs this little gem with practical advice such as wills, trusteeships, guardianships, driving and home safety, mobility aids, hospital visits, accommodation, travel, demographic charts, ideas for gifts, special occasions, the best times to visit one's loved one, activities and support groups, finances, and much more. There is also a section on avoiding burnout. This invaluable book is a must for the one in five Canadians who are providing or will provide care to an elderly parent.

— Kenna McKinnon

View more reviews at Amazon.ca